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Dedicated to Our Lady, Totus2us is giving voice to faith, hope and love from all around the world and focusing particularly on the teachings of Saints Paul VI & John Paul II, Papas Benedict XVI & Francis. In the last 10 years there have been voices from 128 countries on over 40 audio Totus2us podcasts. All free, all with music and on Totus2us RSS feeds, Spotify & iTunes amongst others, most mp3 episodes fall broadly into three areas: prayer (faith / way), Catholic teaching (hope / truth) and witness (love / life). By dwelling on what is good, true and beautiful, it is hoped Totus2us can help us to pray and have the courage to trust in and follow Jesus.

Some of the feast days in this month of the Holy Rosary: 1st October - St Thérèse of the Child Jesus 
4th October - St Francis of Assisi  5th October - St Faustina Kowalska  7th October - Our Lady of the Rosary 
9th October - St John Leonardi & Bl John Henry Newman  11th October - St John XXIII
13th October - 102nd anniversary of Our Lady's final apparition in Fatima when there was a miracle of the sun
15th October - St Teresa of Jesus, Doctor of the Church  16th October - St Margaret Mary Alacoque
17th October - St Ignatius of Antioch  19th October - Ss John de Brebeuf, Isaac Jogues, Noël Chabanel
22nd October - St John Paul II  28th October - Saints Simon & Jude  30th October - St Alphonsus Rodriguez SJ

Today's something about Mary

is by Mauricio, from Chile      

"Mary is my mother, yes my mother. .. I love her deeply like a little boy. When I see her I feel like a child again."

On Sunday 13 October 2013, Pope Francis consecrated the world to the Immaculate Heart of Mary in front of the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in St Peter's Square. In June 1981 (just a month after the assasination attempt on JPII on the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima), it was reported the Blessed Virgin Mary first appeared to 6 children in Medjugorje (in what was then communist Yugoslavia), introducing herself to them as the 'Queen of Peace'. The 6 visionaries say she has been appearing every day since.

3 2us on John Henry Newman      

Father Ian Ker: "When the Catholic Church canonises somebody they're talking about heroic virtue, heroic sanctity, that a person was heroic, they're not talking about somebody being faultless. I think sometimes people used to say 'O well, Newman had this fault and that fault, so he couldn't be a saint.' That's actually not relevant because no-one is perfect and indeed all the saints have faults. What the Church is looking for is a heroic quality, it's not looking for impeccability, it's looking for heroism and Newman heroically followed the kindly light of truth through his life."

Catechesis with St JPII - Pope John Paul I     

JPII: "The pontificate of John Paul I, although lasting less than five weeks, has nevertheless left a particular imprint on the Roman seat and the Universal Church. Even if this imprint is still not fully outlined: it is clearly perceived. To decipher it to the end requires a fuller perspective. Only with the passing of the years do the designs of Providence become more comprehensible to minds accustomed to judging only according to categories of human history. However a moment of this brief pontificate seems particularly eloquent for all those who have looked at the figure of John Paul I, and have followed his brief activity attentively. It took place in a period in which - after the closure of the Synod of Bishops, dedicated to catechesis (October 1977) - the Church began to assimilate the fruits of this great collegial work and, above all, awaited the publication of the relevant document, which the participants at the Synod had asked of Paul VI. Unfortunately death did not permit this great Pope to publish his exhortation on this key theme for the life of the whole Church. John Paul I did not have time to do it either, his pontifical ministry having been in fact too short. .... 

It definitely seems that the pontificate of John Paul I may be summarised in this single phrase: “Come, Lord Jesus”, “Maranatha” (Ap 22, 20). The Eternal Father considered that this was what was most necessary for the Church and for the world: for each one of us and for everyone, without any exception. And on this phrase we must pause, as the anniversary approaches of the election and, shortly (thereafter), of the death of Pope John Paul I, servant of the servants of God."
(22 Aug 1979)

Catechesis with BXVI - Man in Prayer (II)      

BXVI: "Man is by his nature religious, he is homo religiosus just as he is homo sapiens and homo faber: “The desire for God” the Catechism further affirms, “is written in the heart of man, because man is created by God and for God” (n 27). The image of the Creator is imprinted on his being and he feels the need to find a light so as to give an answer to the questions that concern the profound meaning of reality; an answer that he cannot find in himself, in progress, in empirical science. The homo religiosus does not stand out only in the ancient worlds, he traverses the whole history of humanity. In this regard, the rich terrain of human experience has seen arise various forms of religiosity, in the attempt to respond to the desire for fullness and happiness, to the need for salvation, to the search for meaning. The “digital” man, like the cave man, seeks in the religious experience ways to overcome his finiteness and to secure his precarious earthly adventure. Moreoever, life without a transcendent horizon would not have a full meaning, and happiness, to which we all tend, is spontaneously projected towards the future, in a tomorrow that has yet to be accomplished. The Second Vatican Council, in its declaration Nostra Aetate, underlined it synthetically: “Men await from the various religions the answer to the hidden enigmas of the human condition which, yesterday as today, profoundly agitate the heart of man: the nature of man [ - who am I? - ], the meaning and purpose of our life, good and sin, the origin and purpose of suffering, the way to reach true happiness, death, judgement and retribution after death, finally the ultimate and ineffable mystery that surrounds our existence, from whence we draw our origin and towards which we tend” (n 1). Man knows that he cannot respond on his own to his fundamental need to understand. However much he has deluded himself and still deludes himself as being self-sufficient, he has the experience of not being sufficient to himself. He needs to open himself to the other, to something or to someone, who can give him that which he lacks, he must go out of himself towards the One who is able to fill the breadth and depth of his desire."

Papa St JPII's words to students      
Catholic University, Washington DC, Sunday 7th October 1979

"One thing you have told me already: by choosing to welcome me with the offering of your prayers, you have demonstrated that you understand what is most important in your lives — your contact with God, your searching for the meaning of life by listening to Christ as he speaks to you in the Scriptures. I am pleased to know that reflection on spiritual and religious values is part of your desire to live fully this time of your lives. Materialistic concerns and one-sided values are never sufficient to fill the heart and mind of a human person. A life reduced to the sole dimension of possessions, of consumer goods, of temporal concerns will never let you discover and enjoy the full richness of your humanity. It is only in God — in Jesus, God made man — that you will fully understand what you are. He will unveil to you the true greatness of yourselves: that you are redeemed by him and taken up in his love; that you are made truly free in him who said about himself: "If the son frees you, you will be free indeed" (Jn 8, 36).

I know that you, like students all over the world, are troubled by the problems that weigh on society around you and on the whole world. Look at those problems, explore them, study them and accept them as a challenge. But do it in the light of Christ. He is "the way, and the truth, and the life" (Jn 14, 6). He put all human life in the true dimension of truth and of authentic love. True knowledge and true freedom are in Jesus. Make Jesus always part of your hunger for truth and justice, and part of your dedication to the well-being of your fellow human beings."

Papa St JPII's homily at Mass in Drogheda    
Ireland, 29 September 1979

"I join my voice today to the voice of Paul VI and my other predecessors, to the voices of your religious leaders, to the voices of all men and women of reason, and I proclaim, with the conviction of my faith in Christ and with an awareness of my mission, that violence is evil, that violence is unacceptable as a solution to problems, that violence is unworthy of man. Violence is a lie, for it goes against the truth of our faith, the truth of our humanity. Violence destroys what it claims to defend: the dignity, the life, the freedom of human beings. Violence is a crime against humanity, for it destroys the very fabric of society. I pray with you that the moral sense and Christian conviction of Irish men and women may never become obscured and blunted by the lie of violence, that nobody may ever call murder by any other name than murder, that the spiral of violence may never be given the distinction of unavoidable logic or necessary retaliation. Let us remember that the word remains for ever: "All who take the sword will perish by the sword".

10. There is another word that must be part of the vocabulary of of every Christian, especially when barriers of hate and mistrust have been constructed. This word is reconciliation. "So if you are offering your gift at the altar, and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; be reconciled with your brother, and then come and offer your gift" (Mt 5, 23-24). This command of Jesus is stronger than any barrier that human inadequacy or malice can build. Even when our belief in the fundamental goodness of every human being has been shaken or undermined, even if long-held convictions and attitudes have hardened our hearts, there is one source of power that is stronger than every disappointment, bitterness or ingrained mistrust, and that power is Jesus Christ, who brought forgiveness and reconciliation to the world."

Papa St JPII's address to Seminarians       
St Charles Seminary, Philadelphia, Wednesday 3 October 1979

"I want to remind you of the importance of fidelity. Before you can be ordained, you are called by Christ to make a free and irrevocable commitment to be faithful to him and to his Church. Human dignity requires that you maintain this commitment, that you keep your promise to Christ no matter what difficulties you may encounter, and no matter what temptations you may be exposed to. The seriousness of this irrevocable commitment places a special obligation upon the rector and faculty of the seminary — and in a particular way on the spiritual director — to help you to evaluate your own suitability for ordination. It is then the responsibility of the bishop to judge whether you should be called to the priesthood."

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John Bradburne - his life & poetry      

Ballade Extraordinaire

A Notre Dame de la misericorde
(Ma Dame, si belle, si si)
For viol and voice and harpsichord
(Viol da Gamba and Tenor a broad) ...

Sharing in Mary's Joy - The Magnificat      

Fr Dominic Faure: "“His mercy is from age to age on those who fear him”. One condition is that this joy of receiving mercy, this joy of discovering how unique we are for Christ implies first of all this fear and therefore this poverty of those who know that everything in them depends on God, that everything in them depends on the transcendence of God. The fear of God is not a fear at the level of justice, it’s a fear of the source without whom we cannot be anything, we cannot do anything. It’s a good fear, the fear of those ultimately who are afraid of losing the presence of their source. It’s a fear of sin but more than this, it’s the fear of being cut from our source which is a holy fear and ultimately the fear linked to pure love, the fear of displeasing our source, the fear of hurting the heart of God. So it’s a fear coming from littleness, the fear of knowing that without God I cannot do anything, without God I cannot be anything. It’s a good fear and therefore the fear of being lost without Him. And then, when there is such a fear in us, fear is the beginning of wisdom, then we can be truly open to his merciful love because there is no pride in us. Pride is pretending that I can stand be myself. No. In front of God none of us can stand by ourself, we can only stand because of His merciful love."

In Memory of Me      

John, 29 & from the UK: "The Eucharist is just the most beautiful thing in the world. I think whenever you gaze at the Blessed Sacrament exposed on the altar, for all the wonderful architecture examples or the art works around the world, there’s nothing more beautiful than looking at the Blessed Sacrament. It might appear to be just a white disc but actually you’re looking into eternity, you’re looking at the Creator, you’re looking at Jesus made man and resurrected and there is nothing that can surpass that."

Valiton, 25 & from Goa: "The inspiration that I get every time I go to Mass is that I am seeing Jesus and for me that’s the biggest thing I can offer to God by attending Mass and receiving the Eucharist."

To be a Pilgrim to Santiago      

Mimi, from Slovakia: "Coming to Santiago I was a little disappointed because all that way I had wanted to make it a spiritual impact in my life and I just couldn’t. First of all those worries of daily life: the food, the feet, where are you were going to sleep, we were cold … so it was challenging, a very challenging time. So I felt like I couldn’t really approach all that pilgrimage so much spiritually. So I thought, well I’m sure if this is going to count into any spiritual building or anything like that. But I was really surprised coming to Santiago and we spent three days there and we really let the atmosphere of the Church and the prayers together soak in us and afterwards when I came back home, I really felt the difference. Somehow the Lord has blessed us, a different way than I was expecting and I was living from this experience for another month very strongly."

Man for Others      

Father Vincent Dike, from Nigeria: "So my prayer, my ordination, my priesthood and my vocation I would say came from my mum, who had been praying earnestly, just like St Monica, the mother of St Augustine. But as a person going through the seminary I remember taking a decision after my junior seminary that I wanted to be a priest. This was when I was 19 years old, I was in the senior seminary and I asked God, 'If you know I will be a good priest, please call me to your altar; and if you know I cannot make this, please help me to go and help out my family in any way your want.' And this journey has been amazing. And now 22 years a priest, I'm happy, I'm joyful, I'm enjoying every moment of it."

Go in Peace      

Leon, 35 & from the Philippines: "Very often we hear arguments: why do I have to go to a priest, why do I have to speak my sins? Well, you see, this is not a draconian requirement put on us by Our Lord but actually a sign of his love, that he has wanted to speak the language of the senses, the language of words and with those languages .. he has wanted to say to us 'I absolve you of your sins. I forgive you.' So that with the very ears with which hear the car horns on the street, the very ears with which we hear the most mundane things, we can hear his mercy. And his mercy spoken specifically to our own words, our own description of our sins. .. That's confession!"

...

All around the world - our universal Catholic faith

You can listen by country to the witness given, by young people in particular, on Totus2us podcasts. Countries represented so far are: Albania, Angola, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkino Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, China, Colombia, DR Congo, Congo-Brazaville, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech RepublicDominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Finland, France, the Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mozambique, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad & Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, UK, USA, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia & Zimbabwe.

Countries not included above which Saints Paul VI, John Paul II, Papa Benedict XVI &/or Pope Francis have visited: Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belize, Botswana, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Curaçao, Denmark, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Fiji Islands, Gabon, Guam, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iceland, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Myanmar (Burma), Palestine, Papua-New Guinea, La Réunion, San Marino, Sao Tome & Principe, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates & Uruguay.

Our Lady's message through Mirjana Soldo:
Medjugorje, 2 September 2019

"Dear children, pray! Pray the Rosary every day - that wreath of flowers which, as a mother, directly connects me with your pains, sufferings, desires, and hopes. Apostles of my love, I am with you through the grace and the love of my Son, and I am asking for prayers of you. The world is in such need of your prayers for souls to be converted. With complete trust, open your hearts to my Son, and in them He will inscribe the summary of His words - which is love. Live in an unbreakable connection with the Most Sacred Heart of my Son. My children, as a mother, I am telling you that it is high time for you to kneel before my Son to acknowledge Him as your God, the center of your life. Offer gifts to Him - that which He most loves - which is love towards neighbour, mercy, and pure hearts. Apostles of my love, many of my children still do not acknowledge my Son as their God; they have not yet come to know His love. But you, with your prayer pronounced from a pure and open heart, by the gifts which you offer to my Son, will make even the hardest hearts open. Apostles of my love, the strength of prayer pronounced from the heart - a powerful prayer full of love - changes the world. Therefore, my children: pray, pray, pray. I am with you. Thank you."

Totus Tuus, Totus2us   

Totus Tuus - Totally Yours - was St John Paul II's motto, having entrusted his life, his priesthood, his all to Mary. Totus2us is being built with the same intention: to be all Mary's. The play on lettering gives Totus2us a 2nd meaning - Everything2us - as that is what Mary means to us.

This mosaic of the Madonna and Christ Child is on the front of the Apostolic Palace in St Peter's Square (near the Pope's window for the Angelus prayer). Beneath it is John Paul II's coat of arms and his motto, Totus Tuus; and beneath this is written MATER ECCLESIAE - Mother of the Church.

It is a tribute John Paul II wanted to make to Mary for her having saved his life in the assassination attempt on 13th May 1981, the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima. Just 6 months later, on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, John Paul II blessed the mosaic, a "sign of the heavenly protection of the Sovereign Pontiff, of the Church and of those who are in St Peter's Square."