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Totus2us is giving voice to faith, hope and love from all around the world, especially among St John Paul II, Papa Benedict XVI & Pope Francis's 'dearest young people'. Dedicated to Our Lady, Totus2us wants to highlight what's good, true and beautiful, to help us to pray and not be afraid to follow Jesus Christ. There are voices from 127 countries on over 40 audio Totus2us podcasts. All free, all with music and on Totus2us RSS feeds, Spotify and iTunes (& other providers we can't keep up with :o) Most mp3 episodes are under 10 minutes and fall broadly into 3 areas: prayer (faith / way), Catholic teaching (hope / truth) and witness (love / life).

Some of the feast days this month: 2nd December - 1st Sunday of Advent
3rd December - St Francis Xavier    4th December - St John Damascene   7th December - St Ambrose of Milan
8th December - Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of Mary   9th December - St Juan Diego 
12th December - Our Lady of Guadalupe   14th December - St John of the Cross  
21st December - St Peter Canisius   25th December - Solemnity of the Nativity of Our Lord, Christmas Day  
26th December - St Stephen   27th December - St John the Apostle   30th December - Feast of the Holy Family  
31st December - Vigil of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

Today's something about Mary

is by Graham, who's 26 & from the UK      

"What that means I think is that every time a Catholic says the Hail Mary they can implicitly affirm the Immaculate Conception. Isn’t that beautiful! Every time we say the Hail Mary in the rosary, ‘Hail Mary, full of grace, you were conceived without sin.’"

On Sunday 13 October 2013, Pope Francis consecrated the world to the Immaculate Heart of Mary in front of the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in St Peter's Square. In June 1981 (just a month after the assasination attempt on JPII on the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima), it was reported the Blessed Virgin Mary first appeared to 6 children in Medjugorje (in what was then communist Yugoslavia), introducing herself to them as the 'Queen of Peace'. The 6 visionaries say she has been appearing every day since.

BXVI Catechesis on St John Vianney      

"What made the Curé of Ars holy was his humble faithfulness to the mission to which God had called him; it was his constant abandonment, full of trust, into the hands of divine Providence. He succeeded in touching people's hearts not by strength of his own human gifts, nor by relying exclusively on an effort, however laudable, of his will; he conquered souls, even the most refractory ones, by communicating to them that which he lived intimately, namely, his friendship with Christ. He was "in love" with Christ, and the true secret of his pastoral success was the love that he nourished through the eucharistic Mystery, announced, celebrated and lived, which became love for Christ's flock, for Christians and for all people who were seeking God. His testimony reminds us, dear brothers and sisters, that for each baptized person, and even more for the priest, the Eucharist "is not simply an event with two protagonists, a dialogue between God and me. Eucharistic Communion tends to a total transformation of one's own life. With force it opens wide the entire I of man and creates a new we (Joseph Ratzinger)."

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TOP CHAT with Tricia Bølle      

Tricia, founder of St Francis Xavier Missionary Society: "If God wants something to happen, he just needs his people to step up to do it and He will work through you. You shouldn’t be daunted by the fact that you don’t know the Bible well or the Catechism well or whatever you feel called to teach that you’ve never done before. Trust in God. If He’s calling you to this, He will give you what you need to do and the Holy Spirit will work through you and make it happen. So have faith in God because God has faith in you."

Papa St JPII's homily at Mass in New York  

"I invite you to reflect on what makes each one of you truly marvellous and unique. Only a human being like you can think and speak and share your thoughts in different languages with other human beings all over the world, and through that language express the beauty of art and poetry and music and literature and the theatre, and so many other uniquely human accomplishments.

And most important of all, only God’s precious human beings are capable of loving. Love makes us seek what is good; love makes us better persons. It is love that prompts men and women to marry and form a family, to have children. It is love that prompts others to embrace the religious life or become priests. Love makes you reach out to others in need, whoever they are, wherever they are. Every genuine human love is a reflection of the Love that is God himself, to the point where the First Letter of St John says: "The man without love has known nothing of God; for God is love" (1 Jn 4, 8). .."

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Papa St JPII's homily at St Joseph's Seminary      

""If there is one challenge facing the Church and her priests today, it is the challenge of transmitting the Christian message whole and entire, without letting it be emptied of its substance. The Gospel cannot be reduced to mere human wisdom. Salvation lies not in clever human words or schemes, but in the Cross and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ. The wisdom of the Cross is at the heart of the life and ministry of every priest.  ...

Do not be afraid, I say, because great courage is required if we are to open the doors to Christ, if we are to let Christ enter into our hearts so fully that we can say with St Paul, "The life I live now is not my own; Christ is living in me" (Gal 2, 20), Conquering fear is the first and indispensable step for the priest if he is to open the doors, first of his own heart, then of the hearts of the people he serves, to Christ the Redeemer. You need courage to follow Christ, especially when you recognize that so much of our dominant culture is a culture of flight from God, a culture which displays a not-so–hidden contempt for human life, beginning with the lives of the unborn, and extending to contempt for the frail and the elderly. Some people say that the Pope speaks too much about the "culture of death". But these are times in which – as I wrote in my encyclical Evangelium Vitae – "choices once unanimously considered criminal and rejected by the common moral sense are gradually becoming socially acceptable" (EV, 4). The Church cannot ignore what is happening.

5. And yet, this is only one part of the picture. The complete picture is what I wrote at the beginning of the same encyclical: "The Gospel of Life is at the heart of Jesus’ message. Lovingly received day after day by the Church, it is to be preached with dauntless fidelity as ‘good news’ to the people of every age and culture" (EV, 1). Therefore, dear Seminarians, you must not be afraid to confront the "wisdom of this world" with the certainty of the teachings of Christ in which you are grounded, but above all with the love of Christ, with the compassion and the mercy of Christ, who – like the Father – desires everyone to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth (cf 1 Tim 2, 4). The disciple cannot be greater than the master (cf Mt 10, 24). You will not become priests to be served, or to lord it over others (cf Mt 20, 28), but to serve others, especially the poorest of the poor, the materially poor and the spiritually poor.

Open the doors of your hearts in order that Christ may enter and bring you his joy. The Church needs joyful priests, capable of bringing true joy to God’s people, which is the Good News in all its truth and transforming power."

Catechesis with St JPII - Prudence      

"Prudence is the key for the realisation of the fundamental task that each of us has received from God. This task is the perfection of man himself. God has given to each of us his humanity. We need to respond to this task by programming it consequently.

But the Christian has the right and the duty to look at the virtue of prudence also from another perspective. It is like the image and likeness of the Providence of God himself in the dimensions of concrete man. Because man — we know from the book of Genesis — has been created in the image and likeness of God. And God realises his plan in the history of creation and above all in the history of humanity. The purpose of this design is — as St Thomas teaches — the ultimate good of the universe. In the history of humanity, this same design becomes simply the design of salvation, the design that embraces us all. At the centre of its realization is Jesus Christ, in whom was expressed the eternal love and solicitude of God the Father himself, for the salvation of man. This is at the same time the full expression of divine Providence."
(25 Oct 1978)

3 2us on Pope Saint John Paul II      

Father Greg Morgan: "One of my great heroes in the sainthood, Pope John Paul II, from a very young age had a marvellous impact on my spiritual life, on my love for the Church and on my passionate for the truth. He was such an astonishing human being and there are two attributes that I really want to bring to the fore. The first is very simple: his humanity. What an incredible human being, which I think is something we often neglect to examine, how important our humanity is. The second I say something about is his capacity to witness without fear."

Saint John Paul II, we love you!      

Dorothy, who's 28 & from England: "Reading John Paul II’s book on Love and Responsibility was a really life changing point for me. It’s a book of his philosophy which he wrote before he became Pope and its the foundation for his work on the theology of the body. In the book it really breaks open the importance of the human person and the centrality and dignity of each human being, especially when it comes into love and education of children. His teaching on theology of the body has also transformed my life and it’s allowed me to understand the purpose of the human body, of our bodies, of being created male and female, shedding light on the beauty and the dignity of our bodies."

Catechesis by St JPII on Pope St Paul VI      

JPII: ".. The Pope, whom Christ called to Himself on the solemnity of the Transfiguration, continuously worked tirelessly for the transformation of man, of society, of systems, work which was to bear the fruits so much desired by men, by nations, by the whole of humanity: the fruits of justice and peace. By looking with assiduous attention, and sometimes perhaps with disquiet, and above all with continual Christian hope, at the multiform development of events in the contemporary world, he always worked in favour of that civilization that he called "civilization of love", in the spirit of Christ's greatest commandment.

The Church places herself at the service of this "civilization of love" through her mission, linked to the announcement and realisation of the Gospel. Particularly dear to Paul VI was evangelization in the contemporary world to which — at the request of the bishops gathered at the Synod in 1974 — he dedicated a magnificent exhortation, Evangelii Nuntiandi, which is like a summary of thought and apostolic indications, springing from the conciliar magisterium and the continual experience of the Church.

"The commitment to announce the Gospel to the men and women of our time" he began, "men and women animated by hope but also often troubled by fear and anguish, is without doubt a service rendered not only to the Christian community, but also to the whole of humanity" (EN, 1)
"

Man for Others      

Father Vincent Dike, from Nigeria: "So my prayer, my ordination, my priesthood and my vocation I would say came from my mum, who had been praying earnestly, just like St Monica, the mother of St Augustine. But as a person going through the seminary I remember taking a decision after my junior seminary that I wanted to be a priest. This was when I was 19 years old, I was in the senior seminary and I asked God, 'If you know I will be a good priest, please call me to your altar; and if you know I cannot make this, please help me to go and help out my family in any way your want.' And this journey has been amazing. And now 22 years a priest, I'm happy, I'm joyful, I'm enjoying every moment of it."

Go in Peace      

Leon, 35 & from the Philippines: "Very often we hear arguments: why do I have to go to a priest, why do I have to speak my sins? Well, you see, this is not a draconian requirement put on us by Our Lord but actually a sign of his love, that he has wanted to speak the language of the senses, the language of words and with those languages .. he has wanted to say to us 'I absolve you of your sins. I forgive you.' So that with the very ears with which hear the car horns on the street, the very ears with which we hear the most mundane things, we can hear his mercy. And his mercy spoken specifically to our own words, our own description of our sins. .. That's confession!"

Hope, the Strength of the Martyrs      

Papa Francisco: "This fidelity to the style of Jesus — which is a style of hope — all the way to death, was to be called a very beautiful name by the first Christians: “martyrdom”, which means “testimony”. There were so many other possibilities offered by the vocabulary: it could have been called heroism, abnegation, self-sacrifice. And instead the early Christians called it a name that is scented with discipleship. The martyrs do not live for themselves, they do not fight so as to assert their own ideas, and they accept to have to die solely through fidelity to the Gospel. Martyrdom is not even the supreme ideal of Christian life, because above it there is charity, that is, the love towards God and towards neighbour. The Apostle Paul says it so well in the hymn to charity: “If I give away all I have and if I deliver my body to be burned, but have not love, it serves me nothing” (1 Cor 13, 3). The idea that suicide bombers can be called “martyrs” is repugnant to Christians: there is nothing in their end that can come close to the attitude of the children of God.

Sometimes, in reading the stories of so many martyrs of yesterday and today — who are more numerous than the martyrs of the first times — we are amazed in front of the strength with which they have faced the test. This strength is sign of the great hope which animated them: the certain hope that nothing and no one could separate them from the love of God given to us in Jesus Christ (cf Rom 8, 38-39).
"

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In Memory of Me      

Dorothy, 25 & from England: "When I think of Jesus in the Eucharist I just think of his love for us and the real presence of love. Love is something that we all need, we are made for, we're made in the image of God and we're made in the image of that love that we need. And it is really in the Eucharist that we come face to face with God, that we come into His presence and He loves us, no matter what we've done or who we are, He'll love us and He loves us completely by being truly present there. And becoming so vulnerable to us in the Eucharist, so little and in a way so invisible - we see the bread but it is truly God, it is truly Him. So, yeh, Eucharistic adoration is really a time to come and be love and to love Him. And it's beautiful in the silence as well. There's very little silence in the world nowadays .... and it's in the silence that we have to face ourselves and our brokenness. And it's so beautiful to face that with God in front of you who loves you and to come back to Him."

Incredible Saint Faustina Kowalska       

Patrick, from Germany: "My favourite saint is St Faustina because her intimate relationship with Our Lord has really opened up a lot of things that I did not really know about Our Blessed Lord. Her prayers, or the prayers she received from Jesus Christ, are so powerful and remind us about the message of mercy, which should always be the focus of our faith, and that we can all get close to Our Lord even though we are all sinners, and that we shouldn't despair and always have hope."

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TOP CHAT with Fr Peter Walters      

about his apostolate in Colombia with street-children and the work of the charity Let the Children Live.

"The story really starts back in 1982 when I was a student and I was interested in South America and I saw a cut price deal on an air fare to Colombia and I thought 'Great. I'll go there." And I  went over there on holiday and that was when things started to happen. I got stuck over there because I had a problem with my ticket and I couldn't come back when I wanted to. I could only afford to eat once every two days and one day when I wasn't eating I bumped into a group of children who were begging in the street. Once they realised that I hadn't got any money when they asked me for money and that I was hungrier than they were, they decided to adopt me and they shared their food with me and looked after me. Their kindness, their humanity, moved me enormously. ... For me the encounter with the children was actually a very spiritual thing because I felt that somehow through them God was reaching out to look out for me where I was thousands of miles away from home. I'd got myself into a silly mess, it was all my own fault, and yet I wasn't alone, and yet God was caring for me through these children. And it made me think 'Why wasn't anyone doing anything to help these children?'"

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To download the free Totus2us mp3 audio recordings individually, right/double click on the blue play buttons  

All around the world - our universal Catholic faith

You can listen by country to the witness given, by young people in particular, on Totus2us podcasts. Countries represented so far are: Albania, Angola, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkino Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, China, Colombia, DR Congo, Congo-Brazaville, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech RepublicDominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Finland, France, the Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mozambique, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad & Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, UK, USA, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia & Zimbabwe.

Countries not included above which Pope Francis, Papa Benedict XVI, St John Paul II &/or Bl Paul VI have visited: Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belize, Botswana, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Curaçao, Denmark, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Fiji Islands, Gabon, Guam, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iceland, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Myanmar (Burma), Palestine, Papua-New Guinea, La Réunion, San Marino, Sao Tome & Principe, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Tunisia & Uruguay.

Our Lady's message through Mirjana Soldo:
Medjugorje, 2 September 2018

"Dear children, My words are simple but are filled with motherly love and care. My children, all the more the shadows of darkness and deception are being cast over you, and I am calling you to the light and truth — I am calling you to my Son. Only He can transform despair and suffering into peace and clarity; only He can give hope in the deepest pain. My Son is the life of the world. The more that you come to know Him — the more that you come close to Him — all the more you will love Him, because my Son is love. Love changes everything; it makes most beautiful also that which, without love, seems insignificant to you. That is why, anew, I am saying to you that you must love a lot if you desire to grow spiritually. I know, apostles of my love, that it is not always easy, but, my children, also the painful paths are paths which lead to spiritual growth, to faith, and to my Son. My children, pray — think of my Son. In all the moments of the day, raise your soul to Him, and I will gather your prayers as flowers from the most beautiful garden and give them as a gift to my Son. Be true apostles of my love; spread the love of my Son to everyone. Be gardens of the most beautiful flowers. With your prayers help your shepherds that they may be spiritual fathers filled with love for all people. Thank you."

Totus Tuus, Totus2us   

Totus Tuus - Totally Yours - was St John Paul II's motto, having entrusted his life, his priesthood, his all to Mary. Totus2us is being built with the same intention: to be all Mary's. The play on lettering gives Totus2us a 2nd meaning - Everything2us - as that is what Mary means to us.

This mosaic of the Madonna and Christ Child is on the front of the Apostolic Palace in St Peter's Square (near the Pope's window for the Angelus prayer). Beneath it is John Paul II's coat of arms and his motto, Totus Tuus; and beneath this is written MATER ECCLESIAE - Mother of the Church.

It is a tribute John Paul II wanted to make to Mary for her having saved his life in the assassination attempt on 13th May 1981, the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima. Just 6 months later, on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, John Paul II blessed the mosaic, a "sign of the heavenly protection of the Sovereign Pontiff, of the Church and of those who are in St Peter's Square."