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With its recordings Totus2us is giving voice to faith, hope and love from all around the world, especially among St John Paul II, Papa Benedict XVI & Pope Francis's 'dearest young people'. Dedicated to Our Lady, Totus2us wants to highlight what's good, true and beautiful, helping us to pray, to be not afraid and to follow Jesus Christ.

There are voices from 118 countries so far here on 40 Totus2us podcasts. All free, all with music and available on iTunes, most episodes (audio mp3s) are under 10 minutes and fall broadly into 3 areas: prayer (faith / way), Catholic teaching (hope / truth) and witness (love / life).

To download the free Totus2us mp3 audio recordings individually, right/double click on the blue play buttons  

Some of the feast days in this month of the Holy Rosary:
1st October - St Thérèse of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face,   2nd October - The Guardian Angels
4th October - St Francis of Assisi    5th October - St Faustina Kowalska  7th October - Our Lady of the Rosary
9th October - Blessed John Henry Newman   11th October - Pope St John XXIII  15th October - St Teresa of Jesus
16th October - St Margaret Mary Alacoque   17th October - St Ignatius of Antioch
22nd October - St John Paul II    28th October - Saints Simon & Jude, Apostles

Today's something about Mary

is by Beatrice, whose birthday it is today      

"I feel that Mary was so forgiving and gave her life up for everyone and everything. And we've all got something to learn from Mary."

Happy Birthday to you, darling Beatrice!

On Sunday 13 October 2013, Pope Francis consecrated the world to the Immaculate Heart of Mary in front of the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in St Peter's Square. In June 1981 (just a month after the assasination attempt on JPII on the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima), it was reported the Blessed Virgin Mary first appeared to 6 children in Medjugorje (in what was then communist Yugoslavia), introducing herself to them as the 'Queen of Peace'. The 6 visionaries say she has been appearing every day since.

TOP CHAT with Fr Dominic Robinson SJ     

about his trip to Northern Iraq with Aid to the Church in Need, the genocide there and the hope of the people.

"They cannot stay in the refugee camps in Erbil forever. They want to go back to Mosul, to Qaraqosh, to the little villages in the Nineveh plains where in August 2014 they were driven out. What we encountered there, with these people, with the clergy, with the government officials who we met as well in the Kurdistan regional government, was above all hope. And this always is a surprise .. When you actually meet people who in the most terrible situations  in which they've been separated from their families, from their careers, children's education has been disrupted ... and you hear people say 'We want to stay here. This is our homeland. Christianity has been here since the time of St Thomas and it's our country and we want to go back to our homes and practice our Catholic faith or our Orthodox faith or the religious minorities in the coutnry, Yasidis, Turkmen, these other groups, 'We want to practice our faith in freedom', then it affects you. You realise that this is something that you've got to take back. That there is something deep within these people in the most tragic of circumstances which is driving them on. So that was what the trip was really about.  ....  The sooner that we can have the international community be clear that what has happened, especially since 2014 but which has been building up since Saddam Hussein fell in 2003, to be clear that this is a genocide, it is on religious grounds, then the sooner we can start rebuilding."

Father Dominic is walking 200 km of the Camino of St Ignatius from the shrine of St Peter Claver in Verdu to the Abbey of Montserrat & Manresa from 25th September with 2 parishioners from Farm Street Church, in prayer and solidarity with refugees - more info on their flyer here or you can make a donation directly on their justgiving page here.

Incredible Saint Padre Pio      

Mariam, 25 & half Egyptian, half Lebanese/Iraqi: "Padre Pio really gives me hope even when we are hopeless. And he always said ‘Pray, hope and don’t worry. God is merciful and He will hear your prayer.” So I always carry these words with me and I remember them whenever I feel like my life is a bit torn. So those are miraculous words really for the heart and I hope you can take them with you as well:

'Pray, hope and don't worry.
God is merciful and He will hear your prayer.''"

Catechesis by Benedict XVI on St Matthew      

BXVI: "On the basis of these simple findings that result from the Gospel, we can advance a pair of reflections. The first is that Jesus welcomed into the group of his close friends a man who, according to the concepts in vogue in Israel at that time, was considered a public sinner. Matthew, in fact, not only handled money deemed impure because of its provenance from people foreign to the people of God, but he also collaborated with a foreign and odiously greedy authority, whose tributes moreover could be determined arbitrarily. For these reasons, the Gospels more than once speak jointly of "tax collectors and sinners" (Mt 9, 10; Lk 15, 1), of "tax collectors and prostitutes" (Mt 21, 31). Furthermore, they see tax collectors as an example of meanness (cf Mt 5, 46: they love only those who love them), and mention one of them, Zacchaeus, as "a leader of tax collectors and a rich man" (Lk 19, 2), while popular opinion associated them with "extortioners, the unjust, adulterers" (Lk 18, 11). Based on these references, a first fact catches the eye: Jesus does not exclude anyone from his friendship. Rather, precisely while he is at table in Matthew-Levi's house, in response to those who expressed scandal at the fact that he associated with such disreputable company, Jesus pronounced the important statement: "It is not the healthy who need a physician, but the sick; I did not come to call the righteous but sinners" (Mk 2, 17)."

Man for Others      

Father Richard Nesbitt, from England : "The parish priest came bounding up to me, big smile on his face, and he just gave me this big hug and said 'Richard, don't worry, be happy!' And I just knew - when he gave me that hug, when he said those words to me - that that's what I wanted: I wanted to be happy, to know real, deep joy in a way that I hadn't really in my life up to that point, and that this man, this Church, this community, this Christ whom they worshiped, that was the key to this happiness. And that began my journey. I began to go back to that church week after week, and not only on Sundays. I would find other churches in the city that were open during the day and between English lessons I would go in and just sit down. Every church had a copy of the Divine Mercy painting in, and I couldn't speak very much Polish but when I could look at that image literally walking towards me, almost coming out of the painting towards me, I began to talk to Him, I began to share my heart, my hopes, my anxieties, my ups, my downs, and that was the beginning of a relationship for me with Christ, the beginning of my prayer life really. And I've always been really grateful to that, that's how God brought me to prayer, in such a direct way, heart to heart with Jesus."

... 

Through the Cross to Light - the spiritual experience of Blessed Mother Teresa      

Fr Michael Dunne: "Teresa teaches us: 'If ever I become a saint, I will surely be one of darkness. I will continually be absent from heaven to light the light of those in darkness on earth." The paradox of darkness is that it is the gateway to light, through the cross to light - per crucem ad lucem. The key to holiness in every Catholic's life - not just in the lives of the great saints, every one of us is called to sanctity - must be this interiorisation of the Passion; of what St Paul of the Cross calls 'participation in the Passion.' Because if we can interiorise the Passion of Jesus Christ, live it in our own suffering, then we are open boundlessly to all that the Passion is for the redemption of the world. It is the means of our own purification, living our suffering, but even when we have done that, it is the means of reparation also, that we share Christ's redemptive role in the world, which is the dignity conferred upon us in our baptism."

...

To be a Pilgrim on El Camino      

Lara, 22 & from the United States"I think one of the biggest things I took away from the Camino was just a lot of love. I always knew love was important in life but I don't think I realised how important it was until I went on the Camino. The Camino is a very simple way of life, there's not a lot of money involved in it, there's not a lot of materialism at all in it, but those were such happy days because they were filled with love. And I think that I needed that to really show me that life isn't really anything unless you have someone to give love to and then to receive love from."

In Memory of Me      

Oliver, 20 & from London: "The Eucharist really helps to bring the reality of the Christian life to everything that one does, which is why St John Paul Ii called it the source and summit of the Christian life. Also in adoration as well - that deep desire of the Lord to spend some time with us, to form us. As Fulton Sheen said 'It's like spending time in the sun: we don't know what happens to us but we do change.' So, it's that continual visiting him, being united with him in Holy Communion and also, when we've fallen, to be reconciled to him, for him to lavish us with his mercy again through the Sacrament of reconciliation. But, above all in the Eucharist, it's all about God wanting to be with us."

...

Go in Peace      

Kelly, 15 & from Sierra Leone & Kenya: "I like confession because it helps you release all of your sins and you feel like you can trust God more and you can let go of everything and can like begin to settle down. And it just helps you tune into your faith more because you can understand God more and know that He loves you."

Emily, from the United Kingdom: "I suppose confession can be a struggle and difficult and sometimes embarrassing but I know that God has really used it in my life to affirm me of his love for me. And suddenly I find myself not thinking about my failings and my faults but somehow realising quite how much He loves me and has reached out to me in the Sacrament through his priests, for which I am always deeply grateful and so touched. "

Emmett, 23 & from London: "Confession is liberating. It allows you to speak from the soul and gives you inner peace. So, who doesn't want that?"

All around the world - our universal Catholic faith

You can listen by country to the witness given, by young people in particular, on Totus2us podcasts. Countries represented so far are: Albania, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkino Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo-Brazaville, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, DR Congo, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, France, Guatemala, the Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Grenada, Guyana, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mozambique, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Saint Lucia, Samoa, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad & Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, UK, USA, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia & Zimbabwe.

Countries not included above which Pope Francis, Papa Benedict XVI, St John Paul II &/or Bl Paul VI have visited: Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belize, Botswana, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Curaçao, Denmark, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Fiji Islands, Finland, Gabon, Guam, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, Iran, Jordan, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua-New Guinea, La Réunion, Rwanda, San Marino, Sao Tome & Principe, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Tunisia & Uruguay.

Our Lady's message to Marija Pavlović
Medjugorje, 25 December 2015

"Dear children! Also today I am carrying my Son Jesus to you and from this embrace I am giving you His peace and a longing for Heaven. I am praying with you for peace and am calling you to be peace. I am blessing all of you with my motherly blessing of peace. Thank you for having responded to my call."

“Queridos hijos! También hoy les traigo en mis brazos a mi Hijo Jesús y desde este abrazo les doy Su paz y el anhelo por el Cielo. Oro con ustedes por la paz y los invito a ser paz. Los bendigo a todos con mi bendición maternal de paz. Gracias por haber respondido a mi llamado."

"Cari figli! Anche oggi vi porto mio figlio Gesù tra le braccia e da esse vi do la Sua pace e la nostalgia del Cielo. Prego con voi per la pace e vi invito ad essere pace. Vi benedico tutti con la mia benedizione materna della pace. Grazie per aver risposto alla mia chiamata.”

Totus Tuus, Totus2us   

Totus Tuus - Totally Yours - was St John Paul II's motto, having entrusted his life, his priesthood, his all to Mary. Totus2us is being built with the same intention: to be all Mary's. The play on lettering gives Totus2us a 2nd meaning - Everything2us - as that is what Mary means to us.

This mosaic of the Madonna and Christ Child is on the front of the Apostolic Palace in St Peter's Square (near the Pope's window for the Angelus prayer). Beneath it is John Paul II's coat of arms and his motto, Totus Tuus; and beneath this is written MATER ECCLESIAE - Mother of the Church.

It is a tribute John Paul II wanted to make to Mary for her having saved his life in the assassination attempt on 13th May 1981, the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima. Just 6 months later, on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, John Paul II blessed the mosaic, a "sign of the heavenly protection of the Sovereign Pontiff, of the Church and of those who are in St Peter's Square."